Monthly Archives: January 2015

The USLHS web site redesign goes online, with grant program

American Lighthouse Council

After months of hard work by a U.S. Lighthouse Society design team, the new USLHS web site went live late yesterday. You owe it to yourself to check it out, because it’s as comprehensive a lighthouse site as we’re likely to see. And, it’s important to note, it also rolls out the USLHS preservation grants program.

It’s at http://www.uslhs.org , the same address as the old site design it replaces.

As a board member and one of the beta testers, I had a glimpse of just how much work went into this revamping of the Society’s internet presence. That workload was amazing, and the site reflects that.

The grants program accessed through the site will start out modestly and build as the fund behind it grows and more investment interest is available for distribution. But if you have a project in need of funding this season, check this out —…

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Lighthouses of Northern Florida

Cape San Blas Light Station was moved to its new location in Port St. Joe in July 1914 to avoid encroaching erosion.

Cape San Blas Light Station was moved to its new location in Port St. Joe in July 2014 to avoid encroaching erosion.

Quite a lot has happened in the preservation of lighthouses along the Gulf coast of northern Florida since David Cipra’s Lighthouses, Lightships, and the Gulf of Mexico was published in 1997. (Cipra’s book is a comprehensive history of all the lights on the Gulf coast based on extensive archival research.)

According to Cipra’s book, four masonry towers were erected on Cape San Blas between 1848 and 1885 when a skeletal iron tower was completed. The tower was moved several times back from the eroding shoreline before its most recent move to Port St. Joe. See their website for dramatic images of the 2014 move.

The reconstructed Cape St. George tower with its replica keepers greets you as you arrive on St. George Island.

The reconstructed Cape St. George tower with its replica keeper’s dwelling greets you as you arrive on St. George Island.

Although the final tower at Cape San Blas survived many hurricanes, the tower at Cape St. George did not. Cipra wrote of the 1852 tower being undermined by erosion; however the effects of two subsequent hurricanes and more wave action completely toppled the tower in 2005. The St. George Lighthouse Association salvaged what bricks they could along with pieces of the lantern and reconstructed the tower as the centerpiece of St. George Island. It opened to the public in 2008.

Crooked River Lighthouse was deeded to the City of Carrabelle in 2001.

Crooked River Lighthouse was first lit in 1895. It was approaching it’s 100th birthday when the station was deactivated by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1995. When the Coast Guard declared the lighthouse as surplus to their needs four years later, the Carrabelle Lighthouse Association was formed to preserve the lighthouse. After an extensive and meticulous restoration, it is now open to the public. According to Cipra the tower was given its red and white daymark to distinguish it from the surrounding pine forest.

Crooked River's replica fourth order lens was fabricated by Dan Spinella of Artworks Florida.

Crooked River’s replica fourth order lens was fabricated by Dan Spinella of Artworks Florida.

The Crooked River keeper's dwelling serves as a museum and gift shop.

The Crooked River keeper’s dwelling serves as a museum and gift shop.

The 1842 St. Marks Lighthouse, located in the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, has survived many hurricanes.

The 1842 St. Marks Lighthouse, located in the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, has survived many hurricanes.

In 2013 the U.S. Coast Guard transferred the St. Marks Lighthouse to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service who are in the planning phases of restoration.

Located on the Pensacola Naval Air Station, the Pensacola Lighthouse opened for regular visitation in 2010.

The Pensacola Lighthouse opened for regular visitation in 2010.

Stairs at Pensacola Lighthouse

Stairs at Pensacola Lighthouse

The fifth and final lighthouse on the Panhandle is the Pensacola Light Station. The current tower was erected as a coastal light with a first-order Fresnel lens in 1858. (The current lens was installed around 1869 and continues as an active aid to navigation.) Today you can tour the museum in the keepers’ dwelling and climb the 177 steps to the top of the tower and admire the lens and spectacular view.

All photos by Candace Clifford, January 2015.